MOBILITY FOR SPECIFIC MOVEMENTS

WHAT'S THE DEAL?

All movements are achieved based on the motor-control strategies that the brain has adopted. This means that there will always be a skill component (motor-control) to the tasks that you are trying to do. Using the example of tight calves in the squat, isolating the calves, and doing a calf stretch (to improve the squat depth), will not make much of an impact to the nervous system and its capacities to learn, and improve the squat pattern. In this instance, the calves are not just tight, but they are tight in the squat pattern i.e. task-specific. So rather than taking an isolated approach, a task-specific approach would be to manipulate its environment to improve motor-control as well as working on the limitation. In this instance, the calves are tight in the squat and not just in isolation. 

If we adopt a strategy to stretch the calves whilst sitting into a squat, not only will we increase the range of motion in the calves, you will also simultaneously improve the nervous system’s motor-control of this movement, thus improving both skill and physical capacities at the same time. This is a much more effective and logical strategy to adopt – using task-specific drills to work on the task specific limitations. 

In this section, we will show you options for increasing mobility in certain areas, based on the basic compound lifts. It is up to you to add in any additional mobility drills that you feel is of benefit based on your own movement limitations. In an ideal world, it would be great to be able to individualise these to each and every one of you however, it would be a near impossible task.  With this format, it will not only encourage you to learn more about yourself, it will also solve this part of the warm up.

 
 

ANKLE MOBILITY IN SQUAT

TRUNK EXTENSION IN SQUAT

OVERHEAD PRESS RESTRICTION

ADDUCTOR MOBILITY IN SQUAT

TRUNK EXTENSION IN DEADLIFT

INTERNAL ROTATION IN SQUAT

INTERNAL ROTATION IN DEADLIFT